Book Design

There’s something that I’m really coming to like about being with a small press: inclusion.

A little general background before we move on to specifics. Things like cover art and book design are business decisions. At a large press, the marketing department has a big say in those things, the author not so much. Self-published authors have much more control; they can choose their own artists and editors, and even overrule them, but it’s a ton of work to do everything a publisher does, and they have to pay for all those specialists.

Working with a small press can put an author on middle ground. You don’t get the marketing clout of the giants, but you don’t have to surrender to the machine. For me, this is turning out to be a happy place: Five Rivers keep me involved. Cover artist Ann Crowe and I exchanged emails for weeks.

I got an email the other day, it seems there’s a new guy on the Avians team. Éric Desmarais is working on the book design. He’ll be setting up the interior layout to make the pages look nice. That includes details like the choice of font, whether a chapter title falls at the top of the page or halfway down, the amount of white space (blank paper) between scenes and chapters and a slew of other details.

In a nutshell, Avians is about girls who fly gliders. Éric wanted to know what the gliders looked like. He was thinking some little glider silhouettes would make nice scene separators, but he wanted to get them right. I approve, because the gliders in question are unusual. They’re like a sailplane from our 1930’s, of wood and fabric construction, but they carry a wicker cargo pod that they can drop.  Stock clipart isn’t going to do them justice.

So I got out my graphics software, and drew these:trainer-3-view-003

Éric likes them, so I’m fairly confident they’ll be in the finished book. They’ll be small, of course, about the size of a paperclip, which is why I kept them so simple. You might be asking why three designs, why not just one? Well, Avians is written from three points of view, and each change of viewpoint requires a scene change. Éric says he likes the idea of a different graphic to introduce the scenes for each character. Raisa, the main character, will get the head-on view; her rival and sometime antagonist Mel will get the side view; and Corby, who has a more mature perspective, will get the overhead view.

I’m guessing that some readers will never make the connection. That’s the thing about book design. It’s like the frame around a picture: it’s jarring if it’s ugly, but if it’s harmonious, you don’t really notice it except as part of the whole. I just grabbed my Kobo to look at A Town Called Forget, by C.P. Hoff, because it had nice design. There’s a little graphic of a stack of letters tied up with a ribbon at the start of each chapter, and that’s very appropriate, because the letters from home are a key feature of the story. I checked the credits, and book design was by Éric Desmarais. I’m excited to have him on my side. I think his work is going to be beautiful. I’ll notice, and I hope you will, too.

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