I Built New Steps

As my spring blogging frenzy ended*, I decided to tackle a home maintenance project that needed doing.

*Starting in March, I wrote 56 blog posts in 58 days for Lake of the Woods Ice Patrol.

I took several hundred aerial photographs and also received pictures from many other contributors. I edited and posted about 200 photos to document the lake’s spring thaw.

Ice Patrol hit new highs for numbers of visits, shattering the old mark of 10,000 visits in a week by hitting 14,000 and 16,000 in consecutive weeks.

This is more traffic than Timothy Gwyn Writes by several orders of magnitude, so thanks for visiting!

When we bought this house, it had crumbling concrete front steps. I jack-hammered them out long ago and replaced them with wooden steps. However, those  began to fail last year as rust weakened the little metal brackets that supported the treads.

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I made some temporary repairs last fall, but it was time for an overhaul. I figured a professional could do this in a weekend. I am not a pro, so I booked a week off work.

If I was going to do a major rebuild, I wanted to make one important design change. The old steps were steep, and one winter I took a nasty fall when they were icy. I wanted steps with big enough treads for secure footing. After much pondering, I decided the best way to achieve this was to raise the height of the landing. That way I could make the lower flight stretch out closer to the sidewalk, and the upper flight could keep the same run over a smaller rise.

The old landing sat directly on the concrete slab. Here you can see the frame of the new landing, raised about fifteen inches. This is now the fixed position from which the other stairs will rise to the front door and descend to the sidewalk. Because the sidewalk is steeply sloped, I don’t have to worry about getting the bottom step at the correct height, and there’s some wiggle room at the front door, too.

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I had to redo part of this because I forgot to double the joists on the two sides that would support the flights of steps, but it wasn’t hard to correct.

Next was decking the landing to make it easier to walk back and forth to where my stack of boards and saw were located.

To gap the boards, I used a fistful of shims, pushed in the same distance to get the spacing even. This works even if the old boards are a smidge out of square.

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Here’s the beefed up landing with the stringers for the lower flight attached. I used steel stringers because I could get the rise and run I wanted. Positioning and leveling the concrete paving slabs was simply a matter of being patient and picky. I have these qualities in abundance.

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The treads went on, and the lower flight became usable, allowing us to reach our back door from the street. I moved the mailbox back to its regular spot. But my week off was half over, and there was still lots to do.

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In the picture above, note the upper landing by the front door. It was worn, and I wanted to rebuild it before the upper flight went on, so that all the steps would be the same height.

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This shows the revised landing at the front door. It’s just quarter of an inch higher than the old one, but it’s also extended by several inches to mate up with the stringer for the upper flight of steps.

Decking the upper landing would be next. It’s wider than I thought, (either I forgot to measure it, or I didn’t remember it correctly) so I had to go back to the lumberyard for some longer 2×6’s.

I got the steps finished before my week off was over, but not the handrail, so I built the railing on the following weekend.

The old rail was awkward. Not only was it too low, the wide cap on top didn’t offer a secure grip. Inconveniently, the house siding was put on after the rail was attached, so I had to cut and patch some of the siding.

Here’s my design, with double board posts, a 2×4 cap, and a 2×6 railing to hold on to.

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I did this whole project with a hand-held Skil-saw. A miter saw or radial-arm saw would have made some of these angled cuts easier.

The picture above doesn’t really show the corner post. It’s built up, herringbone style, from different width boards.

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Because of the corner post’s doubled L-shaped cross section, and because the lower handrail is anchored to the massive wooden retaining wall near the sidewalk, the whole railing is extremely sturdy.

I’m happy to say the new steps really do feel easier and safer to climb, and I’m proud of how they look.

 

 

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