Belated Update

It’s really easy to procrastinate on blogging. It’s been most of a year since I posted about my new steps.

I apologize to all my out-of-town friends who check my blog to see if I’m still okay, still writing, etc. I’m fine, and I’m still writing, but there are some changes with that. More later.

One of the reasons I didn’t do another post after the steps-building one–they’re fine, by the way, thanks for asking–was that the next interesting thing I did was another carpentry project, and I didn’t want to turn this into a DIY blog. I mean, I already did that bookshelf thing, too.

Nonetheless, let’s get this out of the way. Long long ago, my wife gave me a Black and Decker Workmate. I’ve used it a lot, mainly because I don’t have an actual workshop with a real workbench. I tend to do carpentry jobs outdoors, on the deck. That means the Workmate gets exposed to the elements. Kenora has all the elements.

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So, umm, there’s been some wear and tear. You can click on the picture to see the full horror. A few years ago, I tried to buy replacement boards, but Black and Decker has moved on: the Workmate 200 is obsolete, and parts (especially the particle-board jaws which are popular because of see photo above) are no longer in stock.

No probs, I said, I’ll just make some. Out of some nice solid hardwood. Nope.

The boards need to be precisely one inch thick. One-inch thick hardwood planks are only nominally an inch; on an actual ruler, they check in at three-quarters of an inch, so the cute little plastic clamp thingies wouldn’t fit even if you could get the other hardware to go together. This led to a delay.

Fast forward to the front steps project. The Workmate spent a fortnight outdoors. I’m so sorry. How can I make it up to you? How about I make you some new jaws out of, oh, I don’t know, plastic cutting boards or something? Nope.

That teflonny plastic they make cutting boards out of is A) stupid expensive, at least in retail form, and B) really hard to glue together to make material an inch thick. But.

Whoa, wholesalers SELL high density polypropylene in slabs an inch thick. In different colours. And, among other sizes, two feet square, which is just right. I wanted to do black, because Darth Vader vibes, but chickened out in case I needed to make pencil markings on it. I settled on light grey.

I left the protective skin on while I cut two boards from the slab and drilled them for the mounting hardware. They were fun to drill: the wood-boring bits went through the plastic easily, but instead of handfuls of wood shavings, they produced continuous long spirals of thin plastic that spun around the drill in huge tangled threads. Mostly easy to clean up.

I used a router to cut the grooves in the jaw edges that hold pipe and so on.

When I was done, and put everything together, it looked like this.

Hardwood would have been prettier and hopefully more sustainable, but the plastic will be very weatherproof, and the old Workmate won’t end up in a disposal bin for a long time.

Speaking of disposal, our trusty old 2005 Honda CR-V had to be put down this summer. To be honest, we were thinking of replacing it anyway. It had 354,000 kilometers on the odometer(!), and there were some broken sub-frame components. Then we took a huge rock to the windshield, which was the straw that broke the camel’s back. Also, a third airbag recall may have been looming on the horizon, and there was a good chance Honda would have bought the vehicle rather than do a job that expensive.

In the end, it was moot. On Canada Day we had a collision at the Harbourfront roundabout. A pickup truck from BC failed to notice we had the right of way and went through the yield sign to T-bone us. The Silverado gouged up the whole right side of the CR-V. No one was hurt, there was barely a scratch on the Silverado, and the whole aftermath was amicable. But with damage to both passenger side doors and the front and rear fender panels of the Honda, repairs were worth far more than the vehicle.

While we were waiting for the insurance company to settle up, we went shopping. The new CR-V felt too big, so we ended up with a Hyundai Tucson.

The payout from Economical Insurance was better than I expected. Which is not to say it went far towards a new SUV, of course, but it paid for nice winter rims and tires with a bit left over.

Earlier, I said I was still writing. That’s true, but Bandits, the sequel to Avians, has not progressed much. A course last January left me feeling that some challenging changes were needed, and although I have mapped out some of that, I have not done much of the actual rewriting.

I want to revise “Fermi High.” It’s a short story about a new kid in school on the moon, and it won a little contest, but has never been otherwise published. I’d like to give it a more exciting ending, and it would probably be best to downplay the main character’s awareness of his female co-students bodies. While what I wrote was true to how I remember grade seven, and not at all explicit, it skews the story away from a middle-grade market.

I’m also still pondering changes to “Ill Wind.” This story about an AI has some good worldbuilding, but I’d like more character development and a subtler plot.

One bright spot: my short story “Far Gone,” which was published by NewMyths.com a while back has been selected for their second anthology: Twilight Worlds is now scheduled to hit bookstores in late spring. By the way, “Far Gone” is something of a prequel to Avians. It predates Raisa’s adventure by some two hundred years. NewMyths also published “The Emperor’s Dragon,” in which I speculate on how China could have had powered flight a thousand years before the Wright Brothers.

Side note: the original contract for “Far Gone” included the option of non-exclusive reprint rights (in case it was selected for an anthology) for the modest sum of $20. (US) They must have raised their rates in the meantime, because they upped their offer to $30. I’m not complaining. Reprint rights are along the lines of money for old rope. The story’s been sold once at it’s best price, anything more is a bonus.

I mention these numbers just to illustrate how Science Fiction–and probably most other types of fiction–don’t pay a ton of money.

Magazine articles are apparently in a different league. I won’t give details, but let’s say there’s an order of magnitude at play.

I had an article published in Kenora Stuff Magazine this winter, I have one coming out in the next issue of Lake of the Woods Area News, and quite likely another one with them a little later in the spring.

Three magazine articles will net me more money than all the short story payments, royalties, reprint rights and appearance honorariums for every work of SF I ever wrote combined.

For the first time, I turned a profit last year. Mainly because I didn’t go to any conventions. I love them, but they’re expensive.

To be fair, I’d sell more science fiction if I was more dogged about querying. After making about three enquiries, I usually shelve something. Many other authors, when they read that, will be surprised that I’m published at all.

But even in this regard, non-fiction is doing better for me. I didn’t have to approach those magazines, they contacted me because my other blog, the Lake of the Woods Ice Patrol, is well-known.

So forgive me, but I’m prioritizing non-fiction at the moment. If it helps, I’m sad that it pays so much better. I wish creative writing, and creative arts generally, paid better than simply explaining stuff. The idea that I might have the skills to be a decent writer of technical manuals fills me with dread. And don’t worry: the stories in my head won’t leave me alone. They will find their way out eventually.

I continue to do flash-fiction narrations for the Antipodean SF Radio Show and podcast. I’ve done about forty of them so far. Antipodean SF is home to two of my own flash fiction short stories: “Freezer Burn,” another prequel to Avians, and “Zeta Series,” light-hearted horror about lab rats.

One last thing. My friend Lindsay Kitson, a fellow writer of Sky-Fi, has advanced her aviation career to the next level. After a stint as a bush pilot, she is moving over to the medevac biz. I’m very excited for her.

Lindsay is also the prime mover of our critique group, so our meetings may be infrequent in the months to come. The whole flying for a living thing can make actually having a life difficult.

 

I Built New Steps

As my spring blogging frenzy ended*, I decided to tackle a home maintenance project that needed doing.

*Starting in March, I wrote 56 blog posts in 58 days for Lake of the Woods Ice Patrol.

I took several hundred aerial photographs and also received pictures from many other contributors. I edited and posted about 200 photos to document the lake’s spring thaw.

Ice Patrol hit new highs for numbers of visits, shattering the old mark of 10,000 visits in a week by hitting 14,000 and 16,000 in consecutive weeks.

This is more traffic than Timothy Gwyn Writes by several orders of magnitude, so thanks for visiting!

When we bought this house, it had crumbling concrete front steps. I jack-hammered them out long ago and replaced them with wooden steps. However, those  began to fail last year as rust weakened the little metal brackets that supported the treads.

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I made some temporary repairs last fall, but it was time for an overhaul. I figured a professional could do this in a weekend. I am not a pro, so I booked a week off work.

If I was going to do a major rebuild, I wanted to make one important design change. The old steps were steep, and one winter I took a nasty fall when they were icy. I wanted steps with big enough treads for secure footing. After much pondering, I decided the best way to achieve this was to raise the height of the landing. That way I could make the lower flight stretch out closer to the sidewalk, and the upper flight could keep the same run over a smaller rise.

The old landing sat directly on the concrete slab. Here you can see the frame of the new landing, raised about fifteen inches. This is now the fixed position from which the other stairs will rise to the front door and descend to the sidewalk. Because the sidewalk is steeply sloped, I don’t have to worry about getting the bottom step at the correct height, and there’s some wiggle room at the front door, too.

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I had to redo part of this because I forgot to double the joists on the two sides that would support the flights of steps, but it wasn’t hard to correct.

Next was decking the landing to make it easier to walk back and forth to where my stack of boards and saw were located.

To gap the boards, I used a fistful of shims, pushed in the same distance to get the spacing even. This works even if the old boards are a smidge out of square.

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Here’s the beefed up landing with the stringers for the lower flight attached. I used steel stringers because I could get the rise and run I wanted. Positioning and leveling the concrete paving slabs was simply a matter of being patient and picky. I have these qualities in abundance.

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The treads went on, and the lower flight became usable, allowing us to reach our back door from the street. I moved the mailbox back to its regular spot. But my week off was half over, and there was still lots to do.

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In the picture above, note the upper landing by the front door. It was worn, and I wanted to rebuild it before the upper flight went on, so that all the steps would be the same height.

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This shows the revised landing at the front door. It’s just quarter of an inch higher than the old one, but it’s also extended by several inches to mate up with the stringer for the upper flight of steps.

Decking the upper landing would be next. It’s wider than I thought, (either I forgot to measure it, or I didn’t remember it correctly) so I had to go back to the lumberyard for some longer 2×6’s.

I got the steps finished before my week off was over, but not the handrail, so I built the railing on the following weekend.

The old rail was awkward. Not only was it too low, the wide cap on top didn’t offer a secure grip. Inconveniently, the house siding was put on after the rail was attached, so I had to cut and patch some of the siding.

Here’s my design, with double board posts, a 2×4 cap, and a 2×6 railing to hold on to.

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I did this whole project with a hand-held Skil-saw. A miter saw or radial-arm saw would have made some of these angled cuts easier.

The picture above doesn’t really show the corner post. It’s built up, herringbone style, from different width boards.

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Because of the corner post’s doubled L-shaped cross section, and because the lower handrail is anchored to the massive wooden retaining wall near the sidewalk, the whole railing is extremely sturdy.

I’m happy to say the new steps really do feel easier and safer to climb, and I’m proud of how they look.

 

 

Bigger Better Bookshelf

After I came home from When Words Collide, I had the remainder of the week off to unpack, do laundry, restock the fridge, and all that stuff that’s a giant hassle if you have to fit it in around a full schedule of work.

I also had a carpentry project in mind. My main bookshelf is an odd thing. It was built out of 2×8 planks, and it was originally a sort of room divider in the kitchen. Just over three feet wide, it reached from floor to ceiling, with a mixed layout of shelves. When we remodeled the kitchen, I moved it to the study and used it for books and stuff. As you can see, stuff fit better than books. Although it had a few spaces tall enough for an atlas, as a bookshelf, it wasn’t very deep.

I didn’t take a proper before picture. This was snapped after I began. The part that is stained is the original unit. Note the brackets fastening it to the wall.

The new part is framed in pale wood, fresh from the lumberyard. The second lumberyard. The first one didn’t have three ten-foot 2×8 planks that were straight with smooth edges. So that took all day. On the bright side, I paid less than $50 for the lumber, and about $20 for a pack of deck screws. Any other materials I used were leftovers from previous projects.

Large books hang over the edge of the original design, and many of the shelves are too low to hold books standing upright. So the next step was to take out all the small shelves. These were robustly attached with 4″ twist nails. A claw hammer wouldn’t do it. I had to loosen the nails by pounding with a massive steel mallet (and a scrap board), then lever them out with a pry bar.

So here’s the empty frame. You can see the row of holes in the bottom shelf for the dowels that will connect the new part to the old.

…and here it is with the new section stained and fastened on. I used a gel stain because I am bad with drips if I use a liquid. I do not own a table saw, so cutting the shelves to a consistent length took much measuring and clamping down of guides for the skill saw.

I do, however, own a dowel jig, a legacy from my father. The double-depth shelves are doweled together, including the bottom shelf, where the new wood meets the old. This helped with alignment. None of the planks are perfectly straight, but you can’t tell by eye.

Here it is with the four original full-width shelves reinstalled in the upper portion. Those are spaced at 10″ to hold hardcovers and trade paperbacks. On the new part, the bottom shelf is 16″ high for oversize books, then the next two up are 12″ for reference books and one of my surround-sound speakers. The shelves are now secured with 4″ deck screws, on account of I suck at driving nails.

This is the completed project, with books installed, plus a carbon monoxide detector. The revised layout gobbled up all the books from the old version, plus every book from a second bookshelf, and still has space for more.

It’s shimmed in one corner because the floor is not level. The whole thing is also secured to a wall stud with a sturdy bracket.

This bookshelf is much more rigid than any particle-board shelving unit. Those planks are strong enough for me to stand on; they will never sag. If you have a ton of books, shelves made from cheap but sturdy lumber might be the way to go.