Dinner Debriefings: PZA & Chianti in Calgary

It was too busy to write these up as I squeezed dinner into my WWC convention schedule, but here goes.

On Friday, we walked to PZA on the Macleod Trail and ate on the patio. The food was quite good, but I ordered the wrong thing. I’m pretty sensitive to salt, and the pepperoni and mushroom was too salty for me. The staff were very good about switching us over to a ham and pineapple, but our replacement order hit the kitchen at a peak period, and it took a long time. The manager was very apologetic, and both pizzas were free. I might go back; the replacement pizza was good, the service was fine, and the patio was very comfortable.

On Saturday, we did pasta at Chianti on the Macleod Trail. It was another lovely evening, so we ate on the patio there, too. The bread and salad were very nice, but the service rather spoiled the meal. Wine didn’t arrive with our salads, and when we were only halfway through our salads, the pasta came. At that moment, the waiter told us the wine we had ordered was out of stock, so we finished our salads while our spaghetti alla carbonara and fettuccine supremo sat. Then we sat while our waiter took another tables order. Then the wine came and we ate warm pasta that was starting to stick together. The food was tasty, and we both approved, but presentation was plain. It took a long time to get the bill; we thought our waiter had forgotten us. We probably wouldn’t go back. On a quieter night, with a more experienced waiter, you might have a much nicer experience.

On Sunday, we returned to Broken Plate and had another terrific dinner there.

Dinner Debriefing: Broken Plate

A twelve minute walk from the Delta Calgary South is a Greek restaurant called Broken Plate which gets good write-ups on Trip Advisor. (I used to be a contributor to TA until I changed my email address and lost my account.) Anyway, it sounded about right to us, so off we went. Thunderstorms threatened, so we let Marsha, the concierge, loan us two umbrellas. This made me feel so very British. I used them to push the pedestrian crosswalk buttons. Call me Steed. We never had to deploy them; we arrived at the restaurant just as the first drops fell. We were sitting comfortably at our table when the skies opened.

Shared a calamari to start, divine. I felt like Avgolemono, which was different from the one at home (meaning Dino’s in Kenora) This was a lighter-bodied soup with chunks of chicken as well as the expected rice. I liked it. Both of us wavered on what to eat, torn between two or more dishes. For me, it was the Zeus Chicken, the Lamb Sword or the Greek Ribs. Caroline dithered between the Lamb Shanks and the Pickerel. In the end, she chose the Pickerel, which came with a Orange Saffron sauce and a side of Risotto. I decided on the ribs, and showed off my manners (well, one manner) by eating them with a knife and fork. Both meals were delicious, and Caroline especially enjoyed the risotto. We quickly decided to return on Sunday, which is the next evening when we know we’ll have time to walk to and from a restaurant together.

Broken Plate takes pride in an extensive list of wines by the glass. Caroline had some Seven Peaks Chardonnay and I went with an Octavia Merlot. Both are Californian- we gravitate towards West Coast wines.

Caroline treated herself to a lemon tart with raspberries for dessert while I finished with a coffee and espresso. Which I combined, a bad habit I picked up from a barista at my local Starbucks. The tart was amazing, and large enough that we brought nearly half back to our hotel. The weather had cleared by then, and although another cell loomed over downtown, causing arriving aircraft to swing wide to avoid turbulence, we stayed dry.

Good dinner.

Kenora to Calgary

Our trip is off to a fairly good start. I’m writing this from our Calgary hotel room, and my brother is safely in Kenora, cat-sitting with all his might.

The flight was uneventful, and the threat of rain in Calgary abated for our arrival. Once again, I did not recognize either pilot. I figure nearly five percent of WestJet pilots are personal friends/former co-workers, but they must all conspire to avoid flying the trips I have tickets on.

Cab-fare from airport to hotel was steep, (>$50) and the cabbie dropped us at the wrong entrance.

We had identified some nice restaurants downtown, but transportation looks to be a challenge.That means we’ll be looking for something within walking distance. Hats off to When Words Collide for providing a map of restaurants and stores close to the Delta South. I plan to post a Dinner Debriefing, but first we have to figure out where we’ll go.

 

When Words Collide

When Words Collide is Calgary’s big writer’s convention in August and it’s strong on Speculative Fiction. I wanted to go last year, but it sold out while I was waiting to see if a health issue was going to be a problem. This year, I not only get to go, I get to be a presenter!

I’m taking An SF Writer’s Glossary of Alternative Aviation on the road. Before I heard of the A to Z Blogging Challenge, I had the Glossary in mind as a talk/slide show to introduce other authors to some of aviation’s ugly ducklings. I wasn’t sure Calgary would take me on, as I have never attended before and don’t know any of the organizers. It seems the concept strikes them as original, so I’m in.

I have about thirty types of aircraft to talk about, and a one-hour time-slot to do it in. Subtract set-up time and a few minutes to get everyone seated and introduce myself, and allow ten minutes for questions, and I’ll have less than ninety seconds to talk about each type of flying machine, what it does best and badly, what kind of technology and infrastructure are needed to build and fly it, how it has been used in Spec Fic before, and what it can bring to a new story in terms of plot or worldbuilding.

I’d better start rehearsing to see how much I’ll be able to fit in. I don’t want to gallop through it- I’d like time for a weak joke or two. One thing I learned from the A to Z Challenge was that doing it in alphabetical order is not only practical, it actually lends itself to working from the simple to the complex. Many of the mash-up combination aircraft fall neatly into place after the simpler base concepts are introduced.

It’ll be a great way to meet people, and judging from the roster, quite a lot of friends and acquaintances are going to be there too. My own editor, Dr. Robert Runté, is a Guest of Honour, for instance. I’m stoked.